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  1. 9 votes
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    JWF shared this idea  · 
  2. 138 votes
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    8 comments  ·  Proton VPN  ·  Admin →
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    JWF supported this idea  · 
  3. 808 votes
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    JWF supported this idea  · 
  4. 720 votes
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    JWF commented  · 

    This should not be a Proton Pass-specific feature, but instead something for Proton Accounts. I forget its exact name, but Google has a similar feature to designate a digital caretaker for your account in the event something happens to you unexpectedly. There are configurable choices about how someone could receive access and what data they would have access to.

    Something like this for the entire Proton Account would be more useful than Proton Pass alone. I have the same concern for my passwords as I do my Calendar and my Drive.

  5. 1,211 votes
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    JWF supported this idea  · 
  6. 2,334 votes
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    JWF commented  · 

    The Proton Mail contact book is one of the oldest components of the Proton user experience. And it feels like it as a user. Data entry between Web and Mobile is not consistent. There is no client-side personalization when browsing contacts based on information in the contact. Data like contact birthdays does not appear in Proton Calendar. Data entry is a hassle, and data entry experience on mobile is not great. The Proton contact book is also exclusive to Proton Mail, which means any Proton user who has a mobile phone is likely either maintaining two contact books, or chooses to only use one and ignore the other.

    It is time. Proton Contacts needs to become the next cornerstone app in the Proton product family. Instead of being an oddly-integrated part of the Proton Mail experience, graduate the contact book from its humble beginnings into a true competitor that rivals contact solutions from Office 365 and Google Workspace.

    For Business users specifically, Proton Contacts is the missing enabler that would give the Proton product suite the ability to compete at a foundational level with Office 365 or Google Workspace. For Proton Business customers, an address book can be one of the most important parts of an organization. Imagine how useful it would be to provide an organization-wide contact book maintained by admins, while allowing each user under my plan to maintain their own contact book as well.

    The improvements and maintenance to existing apps plus the advancement of new and exciting apps from Proton is great. The Proton product family is very strong, and great UI/UX makes complex security details seamless and invisible for people who don't care how GPG encryption works. But the Proton Mail contact book is one sore spot in the Proton product family that needs love and attention. It is awkward at best. This would be a nice complement to the highly-upvoted idea for a Proton Contacts mobile app.

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    JWF commented  · 

    Proton Contacts is the missing enabler that would give the Proton product suite the ability to truly compete with Office 365 or Google Workspace. Proper mobile support for Proton Contacts separate from the Proton Mail app is the next right step to make the Proton product family a real competitor for any privacy-conscious user or business/organization.

    JWF supported this idea  · 
  7. 22 votes
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    JWF commented  · 

    I am a Visionary user but I believe this could also affect Family users. I am the primary admin of my user group. I am able to assign @pm.me, @proton.me, and @protonmail.com aliases to my account. However, sub-users on my account are only able to assign aliases from my custom domain. They do not have a Proton username and their Proton login is tied to the custom domain email.

    This is problematic, because the custom domain is a `.family` TLD, which is often not accepted as a valid email in many online forms and websites. This means my sub-users use Gmail accounts to forward emails to the Proton account. This is an unfortunate workaround.

    I raised a ticket with customer support. They advised to create a new Proton account, migrate all data from the sub-user account to the new account, add the new user by their Proton username to my group, and then change the custom domain aliases from old account to new account.

    I did this with one account, and it was a painful, manual process. I accidentally forgot to export the sub-user's contacts and permanently lost them. All email read/unread states were reset. It took the course of several days to use the Import/Export tool to download mailboxes from one account and upload them to another. All of this could have been avoided by allowing each sub-user to have a @pm.me / @proton.me / @protonmail.com alias.

    JWF supported this idea  · 
  8. 7 votes
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    JWF commented  · 

    It would require an organization commitment by Proton to operate in India and to likely accept UPI. The benefit of accepting UPI etc. is to make paid Proton services vastly more accessible to Indian customers. I'm not sure what kind of KYC data would be required from Proton by the Indian government to make that possible though. Proton could foreseeably be required by the Indian government to collect data on Indian customers that they may not collect as a Swiss entity.

  9. 40 votes
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    JWF commented  · 

    I give full support for this idea. In order to achieve adoption in the Linux desktop market, it is not enough to only provide RPMs and DEBs anymore. The emerging containerized environments for securely running sandboxed desktop apps are attractive for security and privacy reasons. To win the RPM market, you need Flatpak/Flathub. To win the DEB market, you likely need Canonical Snaps. As a Fedora Linux user, I give my full support to Flatpaks because this would enable me to adopt Proton Mail for Linux as a daily desktop app. I will likely not install it on bare metal, even though I could, because sometimes I need to access my email in an environment where I am not always `root` or have sudoer privileges to install new software.

    JWF supported this idea  · 

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